Archive for category Event Marketing

The Problem With Decision By Committee

Because I’ve been super-busy with a client, I’ve not been able to devote as much time to marketing Storming of Thunder Ridge, the charitable cycling event here in Central Virginia that raises funds for the YMCA of Central Virginia’s Community Support Campaign.

(Actually, I’ve been to trade show purgatory where it apprears I own a timeshare…)

To fill the void, the event director for SOTR has formed a committee as a sounding board to improve the event. In theory, that’s a good move. In practice, it’s been ineffective. Read the rest of this entry »

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Planning For Success

Riddle me this: How to do you convince 500+ cyclists to join a ride that’s only in its third year of existance?

I believe the answer has to do with sound strategy and flawless execution of the plan.

Last time, we explored a strategy for attaining a sponsorship goal of $8000.

(It appears that we’re going to crush that objective – although there’s still work to be done within the strategic framework)

With 100% of rider registration fees going to support the YMCA of Central Virginia’s Community Support Campaign, our emphasis is on building ridership.

So, what’s the plan? Read the rest of this entry »

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Why Does Marketing Always Want To Talk About Strategy?

This is about the time when most folks begin to roll their eyes, fidget and get impatient. There’s a launch or initiative to support and the damn marketing dweeb starts talking about quantifiable objectives, buyer personas and strategy?

C’mon and stop wasting time… Just run some ads and print some brochures. Oh and maybe do a press release and send an email blast. Or, of course, publish a self-serving NEWSLETTER.

Whoa! Bad dream… Thankfully, we got over this last year in preparing for Storming of Thunder Ridge, the bicycle ride on May 20th that raises funds for the YMCA of Central Virginia. Although it took a leap of faith from the event director to agree to go through this process. Read the rest of this entry »

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Gooooooooooooal!!!

The title of my last post – Bigger, Better & More Focused – is the perfect lead-in to today’s topic – setting of goals for the Storming of Thunder Ridge charitable cycling event.

What’s great is that it speaks to how many organizations approach planning. I often hear, “We want to raise the bar…” To which I typically ask, “How much more?” Read the rest of this entry »

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Bigger, Better & More Focused

I’m baaaaack!

Last year when I started ad int… I thought that I’d use it to share experiences and observations about marketing from the trenches. A novel idea, right? Not! I mean, how many times can you write about the crappy ways in which companies persist in approaching trade shows.

Still in its nascent stages, I decided to align my passions for cycling, marketing and helping others by sharing my work to help promote the Storming of Thunder Ridge charitable bicycle event for the YMCA of Central Virginia. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Hard Work Paid Off

I recently attended a reception for the YMCA of Central Virginia where I received the Volunteer of the Year Award for my work in promoting Storming of Thunder Ridge.

Needless to say, I’m flattered and grateful for the opportunity to combine my passions for marketing and cycling to help support a good cause.

But I didn’t do it alone. Read the rest of this entry »

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Etiquette for Promotional Posting on Facebook

Is it cool to promote your event on another Facebook site?

Before everyone shouts, “Hell, yeah!” let me provide some background…

Recently, a friend posted about upcoming bicycle races on the Storming of Thunder Ridge Facebook page.

Our event is over, so there’s no conflict. And the promotion dovetails with our audience who are, obviously, cyclists.

But the poster didn’t ask permission.

To be honest, I’m not sure where I stand. Read the rest of this entry »

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